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THE TRUDEAU CENTER RECEIVES $7,500 GRANT FROM DOUG FLUTIE, JR. FOUNDATION FOR AUTISM

Aaron, Pathways student

Warwick, RI (January 25, 2021) –J. Arthur Trudeau Memorial Center is pleased to announce it has received a $7,500 grant from the Doug Flutie, Jr. Foundation for Autism. These funds will provide critical personal protective equipment and educational resources for in-person and distance learning at Pathways Strategic Teaching Center, Trudeau’s comprehensive education and treatment program servicing children with autism and related disorders.

Founded in 1998, Pathways is committed to utilizing scientifically validated teaching strategies to improve the lives of children with autism and their families. In response to COVID-19, Pathways educators have worked tirelessly to change operating procedures, create a new curriculum plan that supports in-person AND distance learning, and practice diligence in keeping vulnerable students safe. Through this funding, the J. Arthur Trudeau Memorial Center will be able to continue to provide students with autism and their educators a safe and nurturing environment for learning. 

“Doug Flutie Foundation’s unwavering support over the years has allowed the Trudeau Center to make a positive difference in the lives of so many children with autism, and their families. We thank the Flutie Foundation for its generosity and for helping better the lives of the autism community at such a challenging time,” says President and CEO Judith Sullivan.

“The Flutie Foundation Signature Grants help our partner agencies address a variety of significant needs in the autism community, especially in light of coronavirus repercussions,” says Nick Savarese, Executive Director of The Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Autism. “Programs like Pathways are helping people on the autism spectrum live life to the fullest and we are proud to support their efforts.”

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Jessie Perrin ’17, behavior analyst for children with autism and disabilities

Jesse Perrin ’17 (M) grew up volunteering at many organizations, and he always seemed to gravitate towards the kids who were picked on or who were disadvantaged in some way, helping to mentor and teach them despite their challenges.

When he graduated from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (UMass Dartmouth) with a degree in psychology in 2013, he decided that he wanted to pursue a lifelong career of working alongside disadvantaged kids—particularly with autism and disabilities through applied behavioral analysis (ABA).

“I think life is difficult enough as it is, and if you really are at a disadvantage, it’s an obligation to help people who have less advantages than you,” Perrin described. “And ABA provides the best tools to do that in my field.”

While Perrin started on his master’s in ABA at UMass Dartmouth, he kept hearing about the ABA program at Salve Regina. He felt like he wasn’t being challenged enough in his current master’s program, so he made the leap to transfer and finish out his degree at Salve Regina, which he finished in 2017.

Read more at Salve.edu…

 

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